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Clock Tower Structural Review Submitted

"Clock Tower" building showing new exterior treatments on exposed plywood. Photo: Discover Ferndale
clock tower building showing new exterior treatment on exposed plywood 2015-06-18
“Clock Tower” building showing new exterior treatments on exposed plywood. Photo: Discover Ferndale

It was back in February of this year when the City of Ferndale and Art Rojsza, the builder of the infamous “clock tower” building on Main Street agreed to dismiss all their lawsuits and start over.

The first steps in the process of restarting construction include:

    • Rojsza provides drawings and/or plans detailing what has been constructed
    • Rojsza submits a full structural review by a structural engineer which certifies the existing structure is safe and structurally sound
    • If the structure is not deemed safe or structurally sound Rojsza has 90 days to make the necessary fixes. If after 90 days the engineer is still unable to certify the property as safe and structurally sound the building permit will be rescinded and Rojsza will not have the right to appeal that action.

 

Discover Ferndale was recently informed the structural review had been provided to the city and obtained a copy.

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Several deficiencies were identified in the inspection report which focused on the building’s framing. They include (not everything on the report is included below):

    • Roof Framing
      • Complete roof sheathing.
      • Add supports under clock tower beam.
    • All Exterior Shearwalls
      • The plywood sheathing was exposed for an extended period of time so it cannot now be used for structural purposes. The options available include any combination of 1) remove and replace, 2) add new plywood over existing, 3) add new plywood to the inside face of the walls.
    • Upper Floor Shearwalls
      • Finish wall and install ply, connections and hold-down straps.
    • Main Floor Shearwalls
      • Install ply, connections and hold-down straps.
    • Upper Floor Framing
      • Add blocking to new floor joists.
    • Lower Floor Shearwalls
      • install ply, connections and hold-downs.
    • Main Floor Framing
      • Remove exterior stairs and wall on east side.
    • Lower Floor Framing
      • Install floor framing and ledgers.
    • Foundation
      • Finish upgrades to all walls and footings

 

Some of these items are the result of incomplete work as a result of the stop-work order received from the city. According to Rojsza, “Those would be completed [a] long time ago, if not for City actions, disallowing us to keep going.”

Per the settlement agreement entered into in February, Rojsza has 90 days from the date the report was provided to the city (June 3, 2015) to make the necessary repairs and provide the city with a “clean” structural review report. Otherwise, the building permit will be rescinded and Rojsza will not have any right to appeal that action.

If Rojsza is able submit a clean structural review within 90 days, he will be permitted to continue construction within what the active permit allows and following plans already reviewed and approved by the city. These are the standard requirements for any contractor building under a city-issued permit.

The building exterior shows the recent efforts to address the “punch list” items (see photo).

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